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This article has been distinguished as part of the real world and thus should not be taken as part of the fictional universe of the The Lion King franchise.


We Are All Connected
The-Legacy-Collection The-Lion-King
Attribution information
Composer

Hans Zimmer

Mixer

Alan Meyerson

Release information
Released

June 24, 2014

Track

3

Length

3:02

Albums

The Legacy Collection: The Lion King

Appearances

The Lion King

Samples
Versions

Anonymous Audio File Icon Clip ArtWe Are All Connected.ogg 
Anonymous Audio File Icon Clip ArtWe Are All Connected (Score Demo).ogg 

When we die, our bodies become the grass. And the antelope eat the grass. And so we are all connected in the great Circle of Life.
Mufasa to Simba[src]

"We Are All Connected" is a musical piece composed by Hans Zimmer for The Lion King. It was released on June 24, 2014, as part of The Legacy Collection: The Lion King.

Use

In the soundtracks

"We Are All Connected" was first released as part of the complete film score, under the title "What Am I Going To Do? - Sunrise At Pride Rock". However, the album was retracted after one day. On June 24, 2014, The Legacy Collection: The Lion King was released, with the track having been remixed and released under the title "We Are All Connected".

In the film

"We Are All Connected" is the second score heard in the film. It starts playing after Mufasa argues with Scar and carries through the rainstorm. It continues throughout Mufasa's lesson about the Circle of Life and ends around the time that Zazu comes to give the morning report.

Though the score is not part of the original cast recording, it can be heard during the musical itself in the same sequence of events as its film counterpart. The score was slightly altered. Officially, the music is split into two parts, "Pridelands" and "Rafiki Paints Simba".[1]

Behind the scenes

  • The first thirty seconds of the score are used in the beginning of "This Land (Score)".
  • The piece is actually comprised of two separate cues joined together. This is evidenced by the use of the second part of the track later in the film, when Timon and Pumbaa wake up Simba.

References

  1. The lion king conductors score Page 001


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